Project Management Certificate

Project Management Professional Certificate
(18 CEU)

COST: approximately $4,750 (Required texts are not included in tuition)

This certificate is intended for students wanting to develop project management expertise using the framework in the Project Management Institute’s Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide).

Eight Required Classes:

Subject/
Course #
Required Course CEU
PM 9801
Prerequisite to all other courses

The role of an effective project leader is a demanding one that requires a clear understanding of the five project process groups: initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing. Using the Project Management Institute's guidelines, students will learn about the ten management knowledge areas: integration, scope, time, cost, human resources, communication, quality, risk, procurement and stakeholders. This course is a prerequisite for all required courses in the Project Management certificate program.

Required Text: A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), Fifth Edition (Please note: It is recommended students begin reading the first three chapters before the first class meeting.)

1.8
PM 9800

Through carefully structured exercises, students will learn to build trouble-free, dynamic Microsoft Project schedules. The class familiarizes participants with essentials of project schedule management, including: work-breakdown structuring, constraint minimization, task-type optimization, dependency identification, critical-path analysis, resource leveling, baselining, and management reporting.

Recommended: Forecast Scheduling with Microsoft Project 2013, Eric Uyttewaal, ProjectPro (only available on the ProjectPro Corporation website)

Note: Please bring a flash drive to all classes including the first class meeting to save your work.

1.8
PM 9810

This course addresses each of the core competencies required for effective project communication management. The project management body of knowledge identifies this project communications management as a critical process for overall project success, which employs the timely and appropriate generation, collection, distribution, storage, retrieval, and ultimate disposition of project information. It is the project communications management process that provides the critical link between people and the information being generated. What's more, effective project managers are also leaders who deeply understand the process of communication and the importance of authentic communication as a tool for team support, coaching, and team building.

Recommended Reading: Communications Skills for Project Managers, Michael Campbell, PMP (2009)

1.8
PM 9802

Prerequisites: Project Planning & Management Overview; Scheduling Fundamentals, OR experience with Microsoft Project and faculty permission.

This course examines various measures of project performance to keep a project on course. Students will gain insight into best practices in estimating schedules, costs and resource requirements. Using these data, a number of techniques have been developed that help measure project status, and have proven highly successful in assisting project managers to better measure where their projects stand. Participants will examine various ways that managers can make changes to ongoing projects improving performance without being disruptive. We will explore how managers use a variety of techniques aimed at early problem identification, predicting its impact, and how to take corrective actions to ensure the success of your project.

Required Text: Project Estimating & Cost Management, Parviz F. Rad, PMP, Project Management Essential Library Series @2002

1.8
PM 9811

Effective project managers must possess strong skills in organizational planning, leadership, team building, communication, and performance coaching and staff management. In this course students will learn how to use human resources to achieve project goals; the process of human resources planning, facilitating team building among acquired project teams, skills for developing project teams, and managing them. Students will also develop the skills needed to establish clear project roles and responsibilities, institute rules of engagement, and exercise influence within the existing power structure using appropriate leadership styles and coaching. This class will explore critical tools for managing matrix teams and virtual teams.

Recommended Reading: Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results, Anthony C. Mersino, (2013)

1.8
PM 9803

Compared with project work done in the past, all projects today are risky. Projects are more time constrained, they pose greater technical challenges, and they rarely have adequate resources. Techniques to deal with project risk exist, and when you apply them, they will help you recognize and manage potential problems. The course will focus on practical methods for completing difficult projects. Throughout the course, examples will show how to apply these ideas to your projects.

Required Text: Identifying & Managing Project Risk, 3rd Edition, Tom Kendrick, PMP

1.8
PM 9809

This course offers an overview of project quality management processes including all the activities of a project management team that determine quality policies, objectives, and responsibilities so that the project will satisfy the needs of the project's customers and stakeholders. This class will cover the implementation of quality management systems through the policy, procedures, and processes of quality planning, quality assurance, and quality control with the study of continuous process improvement leadership and best practices. The Quality Knowledge Area of project management will be covered with the objective of preparing students for the quality portion of the PMP® certification exam.

Required Text: Project Quality Management: Why, What and How by Kenneth H. Rose, 2005

1.8
PM 9808

This course will cover in-depth the four processes of the project procurement management knowledge area – plan procurements, conduct procurements, control procurements and close procurement. Process components included in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), will be analyzed and explained. Real-world experiences and best practices for effective project procurement management will be explored and applied to the current challenges faced by project managers.

Required Texts:
A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), Fifth Edition
Project Management: Case Studies, 4th Edition, Harold Kerzner

1.8

Two Elective Courses (Choose Two):

Subject/
Course #
Elective Course CEU
PM 9820
Recommended for students new to project management & CAPM® certification candidates

Are there multiple projects within your organization? Would you like to gain access to Project Management Office methodology best practices? This course is designed to help project administrators, coordinators, and associate project managers. Taught in a simulation environment, students will manage multiple projects throughout the course and learn the skills necessary to balance priorities and risks for the organization. At the completion of this course, students will be able to determine the alignment between organizational strategies and project or program selection, describe the elements of an effective enterprise project office, and develop a portfolio planning process. Students will also apply effective project management practices to managing portfolios and programs.

Required Text: The Complete Project Management Office Handbook, Gerald M. Hill, 3rd Edition

1.8
PM 9836

Prerequisites: Project Planning and Management Overview (PPMO) plus all required classes, or project management experience with faculty permission.

This course is designed to prepare project leaders, coordinators and teams to take the Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification examination or the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® examination. These professional designations are recognized worldwide and are administered by the Project Management Institute (PMI). The course identifies and discusses terminology used in the exam, reviews key project management principles, and prepares the participants to think in PMI mode. Topics include integration management, scope management, time management, cost management, quality management, human resource management, communications management, risk management, procurement management, professional responsibility and aspects of a project management office. At the completion of this course, students will be able to use a variety of strategies to understand Project Management methodology and be prepared to turn in their applications to PMI to sit for their chosen exam. Please see the PMI website for credential requirements.

Required Text: All candidates (PMP)® and (CAPM)® will use the same book. Achieve PMP® Exam Success: A Concise Study Guide for the Busy Project Manager, 5th Edition, by Diane Altwies PMP; and Janice Preston, PMP; (January 2016)

1.8
PM 9828

In this highly interactive class, students learn to utilize the increasingly popular Agile framework to manage a project from start to finish. Students will learn the basics of Scrum, an Agile framework for complex projects, by role playing with the Scrum roles (ScrumMaster, Product Owner, and Team) and collaboratively developing common project artifacts like user stories, burndown charts, and information radiators. The class will explore best practices for implementing Agile methods in estimating schedules, costs, and resource requirements. Students will learn to identify problems early, predict their impact, and take timely corrective action. This class will provide a solid working understanding of Agile methodologies.

1.8
PM 9704

Learn about managing international teams in a global marketplace. Maintain effective collaboration and communications with team members without traditional face-to-face meetings. Teams bridging the distance gap and cultural diversity will win clear competitive advantage – less travel, greater impact, backed up with web conferencing, shared space technologies, chat, email, conference calls, and other digital tools. Acquire skills needed for global sourcing. Think digital, mobile, virtual, wireless, and personal to connect and collaborate. Human resources, information technology, corporate real estate – all need to think together about how teams of tomorrow can operate in the most efficient and human-sensitive way.

1.8

Project Management Fundamentals Certificate
(10.8 CEU)

COST: approximately $2,850 (Required texts are not included in tuition)

This certificate is intended for students seeking a solid introduction to core project management fundamental methodologies using the PMI framework in the PMBOK® Guide.

Five Required Classes:

Subject/
Course #
Required Course CEU
PM 9801
Prerequisite to all other courses

The role of an effective project leader is a demanding one that requires a clear understanding of the five project process groups: initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing. Using the Project Management Institute's guidelines, students will learn about the ten management knowledge areas: integration, scope, time, cost, human resources, communication, quality, risk, procurement and stakeholders. This course is a prerequisite for all required courses in the Project Management certificate program.

Required Text: A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), Fifth Edition (Please note: It is recommended students begin reading the first three chapters before the first class meeting.)

1.8
PM 9800

Through carefully structured exercises, students will learn to build trouble-free, dynamic Microsoft Project schedules. The class familiarizes participants with essentials of project schedule management, including: work-breakdown structuring, constraint minimization, task-type optimization, dependency identification, critical-path analysis, resource leveling, baselining, and management reporting.

Recommended: Forecast Scheduling with Microsoft Project 2013, Eric Uyttewaal, ProjectPro (only available on the ProjectPro Corporation website).

Note: Please bring a flash drive to all classes including the first class meeting to save your work.

1.8
PM 9810

This course addresses each of the core competencies required for effective project communication management. The project management body of knowledge identifies this project communications management as a critical process for overall project success, which employs the timely and appropriate generation, collection, distribution, storage, retrieval, and ultimate disposition of project information. It is the project communications management process that provides the critical link between people and the information being generated. What's more, effective project managers are also leaders who deeply understand the process of communication and the importance of authentic communication as a tool for team support, coaching, and team building.

Recommended Reading: Communications Skills for Project Managers, Michael Campbell, PMP (2009).

1.8
PM 9802

Prerequisites: Project Planning & Management Overview; Scheduling Fundamentals, OR experience with Microsoft Project and faculty permission.

This course examines various measures of project performance to keep a project on course. Students will gain insight into best practices in estimating schedules, costs and resource requirements. Using these data, a number of techniques have been developed that help measure project status, and have proven highly successful in assisting project managers to better measure where their projects stand. Participants will examine various ways that managers can make changes to ongoing projects improving performance without being disruptive. We will explore how managers use a variety of techniques aimed at early problem identification, predicting its impact, and how to take corrective actions to ensure the success of your project.

Required Text: Project Estimating & Cost Management, Parviz F. Rad, PMP, Project Management Essential Library Series @2002

1.8
PM 9811

Effective project managers must possess strong skills in organizational planning, leadership, team building, communication, and performance coaching and staff management. In this course students will learn how to use human resources to achieve project goals; the process of human resources planning, facilitating team building among acquired project teams, skills for developing project teams, and managing them. Students will also develop the skills needed to establish clear project roles and responsibilities, institute rules of engagement, and exercise influence within the existing power structure using appropriate leadership styles and coaching. This class will explore critical tools for managing matrix teams and virtual teams.

Recommended Reading: Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results, Anthony C. Mersino, (2013).

1.8

One Elective Class (Choose One):

Subject/
Course #
Elective Course CEU
PM 9820
Recommended for students new to project management and CAPM® certification candidates

Are there multiple projects within your organization? Would you like to gain access to Project Management Office methodology best practices? This course is designed to help project administrators, coordinators, and associate project managers. Taught in a simulation environment, students will manage multiple projects throughout the course and learn the skills necessary to balance priorities and risks for the organization. At the completion of this course, students will be able to determine the alignment between organizational strategies and project or program selection, describe the elements of an effective enterprise project office, and develop a portfolio planning process. Students will also apply effective project management practices to managing portfolios and programs.

Required Text: The Complete Project Management Office Handbook, Gerald M. Hill, 3rd Edition

1.8
PM 9803

Compared with project work done in the past, all projects today are risky. Projects are more time constrained, they pose greater technical challenges, and they rarely have adequate resources. Techniques to deal with project risk exist, and when you apply them, they will help you recognize and manage potential problems. The course will focus on practical methods for completing difficult projects. Throughout the course, examples will show how to apply these ideas to your projects.

Required Text: Identifying & Managing Project Risk, 3rd Edition, Tom Kendrick, PMP

1.8
PM 9809

This course offers an overview of project quality management processes including all the activities of a project management team that determine quality policies, objectives, and responsibilities so that the project will satisfy the needs of the project's customers and stakeholders. This class will cover the implementation of quality management systems through the policy, procedures, and processes of quality planning, quality assurance, and quality control with the study of continuous process improvement leadership and best practices. The Quality Knowledge Area of project management will be covered with the objective of preparing students for the quality portion of the PMP® certification exam.

Required Text: Project Quality Management: Why, What and How by Kenneth H. Rose, 2005

1.8
PM 9808

This course will cover in-depth the four processes of the project procurement management knowledge area – plan procurements, conduct procurements, control procurements and close procurement. Process components included in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), will be analyzed and explained. Real-world experiences and best practices for effective project procurement management will be explored and applied to the current challenges faced by project managers.

Required Texts:
A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), Fifth Edition
Project Management: Case Studies, 4th Edition, Harold Kerzner

1.8
PM 9704

Learn about managing international teams in a global marketplace. Maintain effective collaboration and communications with team members without traditional face-to-face meetings. Teams bridging the distance gap and cultural diversity will win clear competitive advantage – less travel, greater impact, backed up with web conferencing, shared space technologies, chat, email, conference calls, and other digital tools. Acquire skills needed for global sourcing. Think digital, mobile, virtual, wireless, and personal to connect and collaborate. Human resources, information technology, corporate real estate – all need to think together about how teams of tomorrow can operate in the most efficient and human-sensitive way.

1.8
PM 9828

In this highly interactive class, students learn to utilize the increasingly popular Agile framework to manage a project from start to finish. Students will learn the basics of Scrum, an Agile framework for complex projects, by role playing with the Scrum roles (ScrumMaster, Product Owner, and Team) and collaboratively developing common project artifacts like user stories, burndown charts, and information radiators. The class will explore best practices for implementing Agile methods in estimating schedules, costs, and resource requirements. Students will learn to identify problems early, predict their impact, and take timely corrective action. This class will provide a solid working understanding of Agile methodologies.

1.8
PM 9838

Prerequisite: Agile Overview for Project Managers (or familiarity with Agile Management, and faculty consent)

In this two-day workshop, students will participate in highly interactive and hands-on activities. First, students will write user stories using the "INVEST" model checklist as part of a table group (3 - 5 students) on high level Features and Epics. Students will then learn to write acceptance criteria using Behavior Driven Development (BDD) scenarios. On day two of this course, students will learn to prioritize their user story backlog (using the DEEP technique) and estimate user stories. Students will be performing all of these activities in a "time box" (iterative set-up).

1.2

Upon approval by program/advising staff, students may choose an alternate focus that meets their specific training needs. The combination of required and elective courses chosen should total a minimum of 10.8 CEUs to be eligible for a Certificate of Completion.


Online Project Management Fundamentals Certificate
(10.8 CEU)

COST: approximately $2,850 (cost varies slightly according to class choices)

This online certificate curriculum provides exposure to fundamentals of project management using the PMI methodologies.

Once you register and pay for your online course, you may go to iLearn, and log in using your SF State ID and Password. It takes up to 24 hours to process you into the system.

Five Required Classes:

Subject/
Course #
Required Course CEU
PM 9701
Prerequisite to all other courses

The role of an effective project leader is a demanding one that requires a clear understanding of the five project process groups: initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing. Using the Project Management Institute's guidelines, students will learn about the ten management knowledge areas: integration, scope, time, cost, human resources, communication, quality, risk, procurement and stakeholders. This course is a prerequisite for all required courses in the Project Management certificate program.

Required Text: A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), Fifth Edition (Please note: It is recommended students begin reading the first three chapters before the first class meeting.)

1.8
PM 9700

This nine-week online class covers best practices in scheduling: evidence-based task names, networking, resourcing, and estimating average work parametrically. Concurrently, you improve a schedule template of your choosing. Then, you schedule a specific project and link it with a service project to a resource pool. After manual and automated workload leveling and adding a project reserve, you baseline a rapid, reliable, feasible schedule. To control scope, you identify how to quickly assess issues and change impacts. Finally, to recover from likely slippages, you identify which tasks to fast-track, crash or de-scope. For this course, you need access to Microsoft Project.

Recommended: Forecast Scheduling with Microsoft Project 2013, Eric Uyttewaal, ProjectPro (only available on the ProjectPro Corporation website)

1.8
PM 9704

Learn about managing international teams in a global marketplace. Maintain effective collaboration and communications with team members without traditional face-to-face meetings. Teams bridging the distance gap and cultural diversity will win clear competitive advantage – less travel, greater impact, backed up with web conferencing, shared space technologies, chat, email, conference calls, and other digital tools. Acquire skills needed for global sourcing. Think digital, mobile, virtual, wireless, and personal to connect and collaborate. Human resources, information technology, corporate real estate – all need to think together about how teams of tomorrow can operate in the most efficient and human-sensitive way.

1.8
PM 9710

This course addresses each of the core competencies required for effective project communication management. The project management body of knowledge identifies this project communications management as a critical process for overall project success, which employs the timely and appropriate generation, collection, distribution, storage, retrieval, and ultimate disposition of project information. It is the project communications management process that provides the critical link between people and the information being generated. What's more, effective project managers are also leaders that deeply understand the process of communication and the importance of authentic communication as a tool for team support, coaching, and team building.

Required Text: Communications Skills for Project Managers, Michael Campbell, PMP

Recommended Reading: Theory, Process, & Skills, John F. Cragan, David W. Wright, Chris R. Kasch

1.8
PM 9702

Prerequisites: Project Planning & Management Overview; Scheduling Fundamentals, OR experience with Microsoft Project and faculty permission.

This course examines various measures of project performance to keep a project on course. Students will gain insight into best practices in estimating schedules, costs and resource requirements. Using these data, a number of techniques have been developed that help measure project status, and have proven highly successful in assisting project managers to better measure where their projects stand. Participants will examine various ways that managers can make changes to ongoing projects improving performance without being disruptive. We will explore how managers use a variety of techniques aimed at early problem identification, predicting its impact, and how to take corrective actions to ensure the success of your project.

Required Text: Project Estimating & Cost Management, Parviz F. Rad, PMP, Project Management Essential Library Series @2002

1.8

Plus One Elective (Six Classes Total):

Elective online courses are offered on a rotating basis and may include:

Subject/
Course #
Elective Course CEU
PM 9703

Compared with project work done in the past, all projects today are risky. Projects are more time constrained, they pose greater technical challenges and they rarely have adequate resources. Techniques to deal with project risk exist, and when you apply them, they will help you recognize and manage potential problems. The course will focus on practical methods for completing difficult projects. Throughout the course, examples will show how to apply these ideas to your projects.

Required Text: Identifying & Managing Project Risk, First Edition, published by AMACOM, 2003.

Recommended: Project Risk Management, A Proactive Approach, Royer.

1.8
PM 9711

Effective project managers must possess strong skills in organizational planning, leadership, team building, communication, and performance coaching and staff management. In this course students will learn how to use human resources to achieve project goals; the process of human resources planning, facilitating team building among acquired project teams, skills for developing project teams, and managing them. Students will also develop the skills needed to establish clear project roles and responsibilities, institute rules of engagement, and exercise influence within the existing power structure using appropriate leadership styles and coaching. This class will explore critical tools for managing matrix teams and virtual teams.

Required Text: Emotional Intelligence for Project Managers: The People Skills You Need to Achieve Outstanding Results, Anthony C. Mersino.

1.8
PM 9708

This course will cover in-depth the four processes of the project procurement management knowledge area - plan procurements, conduct procurements, control procurements and close procurement. Process components included in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), will be analyzed and explained. Real-world experiences and best practices for effective project procurement management will be explored and applied to the current challenges faced by project managers.

Required Text: A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), Fifth Edition

1.8
PM 9709

This course offers an overview of project quality management processes including all the activities of a project management team that determine quality policies, objectives, and responsibilities so that the project will satisfy the needs of the project's customers and stakeholders. This class will cover the implementation of quality management systems through the policy, procedures, and processes of quality planning, quality assurance, and quality control with the study of continuous process improvement leadership and best practices. The Quality Knowledge Area of project management will be covered with the objective of preparing students for the quality portion of the PMP® certification exam.

Required Text: Project Quality Management: Why, What and How by Kenneth H. Rose, 2005

1.8
PM 9736

Prerequisites: Project Planning and Management Overview (PPMO) plus all required classes, or project management experience with faculty permission.

This course is designed to prepare project leaders, coordinators and teams to take the Project Management Professional (PMP)® certification examination or the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM)® examination. These professional designations are recognized worldwide and are administered by the Project Management Institute (PMI). The course identifies and discusses terminology used in the exam, reviews key project management principles, and prepares the participants to think in PMI mode. Topics include integration management, scope management, time management, cost management, quality management, human resource management, communications management, risk management, procurement management, professional responsibility and aspects of a project management office. At the completion of this course, students will be able to use a variety of strategies to understand Project Management methodology and be prepared to turn in their applications to PMI to sit for their chosen exam. Please see the PMI website for credential requirements.

Required Text: All candidates (PMP)® and (CAPM)® will use the same book. Achieve PMP® Exam Success: A Concise Study Guide for the Busy Project Manager, 5th Edition, by Diane Altwies PMP; and Janice Preston, PMP; (January 2016)

1.8

Upon approval by program/advising staff, students may choose an alternate focus that meets their specific training needs. The combination of required and elective courses chosen should total a minimum of 10.8 CEUs to be eligible for a Certificate of Completion.


Certificate of Completion

Once a student has completed the necessary coursework, an application for the Certificate of Completion must be submitted. Applications for the certificate are due, along with a $50 non-refundable fee and unofficial SF State transcripts, after all grades have been submitted, showing completion of all necessary classes.

Download the Graduation Application below. Mail applications to:

SF State Extended Learning
Attn: Project Management Program
835 Market Street, 6th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94103

Graduation Application

Project Management Institute's® PMP® & CAPM® Credentials

The Project Management Institute (PMI) credentials are obtained by completing requirements set forth by the Project Management Institute, including education and/or experience requirements, completion of an application, and an examination. SF State's Project Management courses fulfill PMI's 35 hour education requirement to become a candidate to sit for the exam.

For a complete list of work and education requirements to become a candidate for the PMP® or CAPM® Exams, please visit the PMI Certifications page.

 

PMBOK, PMP, and CAPM are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

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